Scott's Easy Baked Onions

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Here's a great side dish to accompany grilled or roasted tri-tip - baked onions. There are a couple of ways to make this dish - one in the oven ahead of grilling the tri-tips on the Weber BBQ, alongside the tri-tips if you roast them in the oven, or ahead of time by cooking the onions in the coals of the BBQ fire.

It couldn't be simpler - just takes a bit of planning and a bit of time - but it can overlap with cooking the tri-tips if you first start by getting the onions going.

I like to use just plain yellow onions - available everywhere. A rule of thumb might be 1 medium onion per person - but we really like onions so we usually double up the recipe and keep any left over to warm up along with the left over tri-tip later in the week.

To roast the onions in the oven, begin by pre-heating the oven to 425º F. Then, take a baking sheet or glass baking dish with aluminum foil (to ease the cleanup chores) and simply place the onions on the sheet or into the dish. Put them into the oven and wait - about an hour or so. Test to see if they're done with a knife which should go in easily and come out cleanly. Remove them from the oven and let them cool down so that you can handle them.

To serve, use a knife to cut off the top and, optionally, drop a pat of butter into the onion - seasoning with salt and pepper.

For an alternative technique - cooking the onions in the coals of the BBQ - see this Weber video about "Melted Onions".

My Favorite Memorial Day BBQ Recipes

Charcoal grilled tritip roast sliced

Hard to believe we're into Memorial Day weekend and the unofficial start of summer! It's a perfect weekend for firing up the BBQ and doing some grilling! Here are a couple of recipe ideas to tempt your appetite:

For a great side dish to go with the tri-tip, try my recipe for Scott's Easy Baked Onions - or the Melted Onions actually cooked in the charcoal coals of the BBQ.

Fire up that grill - and have a great holiday weekend!

Scott's Wintertime Beef, Mushroom and Barley Soup

Beef soup

A favorite of mine this time of year is a hearty beef, mushroom and barley soup.

Some might call it a "beef stew" - and they'd be right. But it's got a lot of liquid - assuming you use all of the liquids called for - yet has the great flavor of a beef stew. We made this for a second time today - using an amalgamation of one of Mark Bittman's recipes along with a slow cooker recipe from Cooks Illustrated.

Read on for ingredients and directions!

Continue reading "Scott's Wintertime Beef, Mushroom and Barley Soup" »

What's for Christmas Dinner? Pork Loin w/Apples!

Pork Loin Roast - Dry Brining

Tonight, we're making a pork loin roast for Christmas dinner - using one of our old favorite recipes but tweaked just a bit for this year's event. (Isn't recipe tweaking what fun cooking is all about?)

We're trying dry brining the pork loin for a few hours in advance of cooking. The advocates of dry brining suggest that a day or so is the ideal timing for it - but I didn't decide to try it until just a few hours before we need to serve dinner! So, it will be an abbreviated version.

To do the dry brining, I covered the pork loin (a 3.3 lb roast this year) with salt and put it into the refrigerator uncovered. When it's time to cook, I'll rinse the salt off the roast and then season it with salt, pepper and Penzey's Bavarian Seasoning. From there, it's back to our original recipe!

This pork loin roast turned out REALLY GREAT! Even though the dry brining was abbreviated, the roast came out great - moist, not dry at all - and a perfect compliment to the apple/cream/mustard topping. To add a bit more complexity to the topping, I also included a couple of rosemary springs and a layer of sliced red onion. This combination added beautiful flavor and complexity to the topping.

We've cooked this recipe many times over the years - although not much if ever during 2012. Today's treatment makes us want to come back to it again soon. Try it for your family - it's a huge favorite with ours!

A Perfect July 4th Tri-Tip BBQ

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Are you planning a July 4th BBQ get together with family and friends this year? If so, the perfect BBQ treat is a tasty, well seasoned tri-tip roast - and you'll find the preparation and cooking to be super easy:

Either way, you'll end up with a perfect BBQ treat that your friends and family will really enjoy. Be sure to season the tri-tip well an hour or so in advance. I prefer just kosher salt, coarse ground pepper and a bit of Montreal steak seasoning.

Mix in a few burgers, sausages and hot dogs on the grill for the kids and you've got everybody covered!

Have a wonderful 4th of July!

How to Cook: Easy Tri-Tip Roast on the Gas Grill

Easy Tri-Tip Roast on the Gas Grill

Here's last night's Tri-Tip finishing grilling on the gas grill. So simple to do!

This was a 2 lb tri-tip roast (smallish as they go) that we cooked on a gas grill last night.

Seasoned ahead of time with lots of kosher salt, lots of ground pepper, and a touch of Montreal steak seasoning

Fired up the grill to preheat for 15 minutes, then 7 minutes per side over the direct burners followed by 20 minutes with the fatty side up.

Let rest for 5-10 minutes wrapped in foil before slicing against the grain Turned out perfect!

This would be perfect for your 4th of July BBQ!

Easy Oven Roasted Tri-Tips for Super Bowl Sunday

Easy Oven Roasted Tri-TipsLooking for a super easy but delicious treat for your Super Bowl Sunday get together? One of my all-time favorites is my 'Lazy-S' Easy Oven-Roasted Tri-Tips recipe first posted here back in 2005.

Whenever we're having a group get together, this is one of my favorite meats to serve. It's easy to prepare and cook - less than an hour - and tastes great warm and cool. It's perfect to put out on a buffet table where guests can come back for me - and they will!

The recipe includes a seasoning step the day before - but that's optional. If you don't have that much advance time, just season the tri-tip when you bring it home from the store on Super Bowl Sunday and you'll be good to go.

Enjoy your Super Bowl - and I hope you share a great tri-tip this year to go along with it!

What's for Dinner this Christmas Eve?

This afternoon, we're hosting our extended family for Christmas Eve. We'll be serving a Niman Ranch uncured smoked ham along with broccoli, garlic mashed potatoes, and other goodies.

For wine, we'll be trying a couple of whites that come highly recommended: Eroica's 2010 Riesling from Washington state and a Sauvignon Blanc from J. For the red wine, we've got a couple of great Pinot Noirs from the Duckhorn Wine Company - a Migration Anderson Valley and Decoy Sonoma County.

Hope you're having a wonderful Christmas weekend 2011 wherever you may be!

What's for Dinner Tonight? - Sunday, November 13, 2011

Earlier this week, I stumbled across this recipe for Slow Roasted Beef in Tomato Sauce by Joanne Wilson which I promptly bookmarked as something we might want to make as we move into fall, etc.

Yesterday, I was out shopping and ended up buying a 2 lb boneless chuck roast - knowing that I had this recipe in my head. This afternoon we cooked it - and it was just great.

This is one of those lazy Sunday afternoon recipes. There's a flurry of activity around 1:30 PM as you sear the beef, sauté the veggies, open the wine, prepare the beef stock, etc. Perhaps 20 minutes of serious cooking and preparation - and then you're in monitoring mode for the rest of the afternoon.

Our approach was a bit different from Joanne's. Specifically, we had a two pound boneless chuck roast from our local Safeway. After browning it in a bit of olive oil, we sautéed a container of Mirepoix from our local Trader Joe's before tossing the chuck back on top and then adding the red wine, beef stock, and seasonings. We brought the mixture up to a boil and then backed it back down to the lowest setting on our stove - and just let it simmer for a bit over 3 hours. Along the way, we poked at it every hour or so - getting more aggressive in the last hour.

The result was just perfect. Falling apart tender, superb flavor from the tomatoes, thyme, bay leaves, etc.. We served it simply - with sautéed haricot vert and garlic mashed potatoes. Wonderful.

What's for Dinner Tonight? - Saturday Oct 22, 2011

Tonight, we're making a pork loin roast using this old recipe from Scott's Kitchen. This was one of our regular favorites back in the day - but it's been a few years since we've made it. The feel of fall in the air today tempted us to upgrade to this pork loin roast from a quick pork tenderloin recipe we were considering for tonight's dinner.

I made one addition to tonight's recipe - adding a hearty coating Penzey's Bavarian Seasoning and a bit of lime juice as a rub before searing the roast in the French Oven. Sure smelled wonderful when I seared it just a few minutes ago!

Here's the pork loin as it's coming out of the oven after 55 minutes total time.

Pork Loin Roast with Apples

After taking the roast out of the oven and wrapping it in aluminum foil, it's time to remove the apples and then deglaze the French Oven with a bit of wine.

After deglazing, simply put the apples back into the pot, add in the cream and the mustard and you've got the perfect sweet/tart side dish to compliment the pork. This is a wonderful combination - love those Granny Smith apples!

Perhaps add a green salad like we did tonight and you're done. A great hearty weekend meal!

It's Time for Minimalist Roast Chicken

Roast chicken

It's starting to feel a bit like fall here in Menlo Park - which always brings to mind cooking roast chicken in the oven. We're mostly wintertime roast chicken people - not wanting to bother with it during the summer. But as we get into the fall season, and the days cool off, roast chicken comes to mind as one of our weekend dinners.

I recently came across this simple roast chicken recipe from Mark Bittman. Click through for the recipe and also a link to one of his Minimalist videos where he shows the technique.

It's a really simple recipe. His key breakthrough was discovering that the use of a cast iron skillet for roasting the chicken helped balance having the white/dark meat cooking appropriately. He recommends putting the skillet into the oven when you first turn it on - and use a high heat (he suggests 500 degrees which our oven won't quite reach!). As the oven warms, the skillet warms up with it - so that when the chicken is put into the skillet to cook, the warm skillet will help the thighs and dark meat cook a bit faster while letting the breast meat cook normally. It's this orchestrated imbalance that provides the magic to his recipe.

Give it a try for one of your weekend dinners!

Photo by Rosie 55.

Scott's Easy Skillet Pork Chop Dinner with Lemon-Mustard Sauce

Yesterday, I picked up some boneless pork chops from Trader Joe's - each about 3/4 of an inch thick. These chops are perfect for a quick (25 minutes or so) meals when cooked in a skilled on the stove. They're also low fat!

This technique involves first searing the pork chops on high heat for 2 minutes/side to get a nice flavor on the outside - and then slowing down the cooking with some liquid that helps keep them moist and flavorful on the inside. The mustard and lemon juice used for the finishing sauce adds a very nice sweet/sour taste to the chops - they're delicious.

Here's my recipe - modified from Mark Bittman's recipe.

  • An hour or two before I cook the the chops - or at the last minute if I forgot (!), I first coat them liberally on both sides with my favorite pork seasoning rub - Penzey's Galena Street. This rub is an absolute must have for grilling thick pork chops on the Weber BBQ - and its equally good for these pan-fried chops. Trust me, Penzey's Galena Street Rub is just the best for pork chops!
  • Heat 2 Tbsp of olive oil on medium-high heat in the skillet until it's shimmering. Add the chops to the skillet and turn the heat up to high. Cook on high for 2 minutes per side.
  • Add 1/2 cup white wine, 1 Tbsp minced garlic and 1 Tbsp minced shallots (we love both of these from Penzey's - we're fortunate to have a local Penzey's outlet here in Menlo Park!). Turn the heat down to low and cover the pan. Set a timer for 10 minutes. While you're waiting, you can toss a quick salad or sauté some fresh veggies to accompany the chops.
  • When the timer is up, check the chops for doneness - firm to the touch - and, if done, remove them to a platter. You should still have some liquid left in the pan - if not add a touch of water. Then add 1 Tbsp lemon juice plus 2 Tbsp coarse mustard. Reduce this a bit over medium-high heat and then pour a bit over the chops. Put the rest into a small bowl or pitcher to accompany the chops to the dinner table. You'll want to add more of the sauce to the chops - and maybe the veggies - during the meal!

That's it - about 25 minutes start to finish - not counting the 5 minutes it takes to rub the chops in advance. Hope you enjoy!

Easy Oven Roasted Salmon

We've made this recipe twice this week - and it's a hit in our house! It's another one of Mark Bittman's simple and easy recipes that just tastes so great! I happened to find it on his iPhone app - How to Cook Everything.

I won't bother with the usual ingredients box - it's such a simple recipe. Pick up a salmon fillet from your local fishmonger on your way home from the office (our favorite here in Menlo Park is Cook's Seafood on El Camino). Cooks sells wild king salmon fillets roughly .75 lb in size - a perfect size for a dinner for two.

Put a couple of tablespoons of butter into a glass baking dish large enough to hold the fillet. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees - with the baking dish inside, melting the butter.

While the oven is coming up to temperature (and the butter is melting), season the salmon with salt and pepper.

When the butter has melted into the baking dish, pull it out and put the salmon fillet in - skin side down. It should only be a few more minutes until the oven is at full temperature. At that point, in goes the salmon in the baking dish.

Cook it skin side down for 6 minutes then take it out, flip it and cook for another 4-5 minutes.

Remove from the oven and serve - with whatever you've made as a side dish (our favorite is sauteed mushrooms with cherry tomatoes, shallots, a bit of garlic, white wine, and anything else we feel like throwing into the mix!). Slice the salmon in half and serve.

You'll love it - and it doesn't smell up the kitchen! Total time start to finish is about 20 minutes.

 

A Richer, Creamier Twist on Roasted Tomato Soup

Soup's On! - Roasting TomatoesWe tried a modified version of our Harvest Time Roasted Tomato and Sweet Corn Soup recipe tonight - suggested by our friends at Bogle Vineyards and a recipe they sent out in their latest newsletter. Truth be told - we're suckers for roasted tomato soup!

Essentially it's the same as our original recipe - except after doing the puree at the end, we added about 8 oz of Trader Joe's Super Sweet Frozen Corn kernels in lieu of any fresh corn (no longer available) along with 4 oz of crumbled TJ's Blue Cheese and about 6 oz of Niman Ranch Uncured Maple Bacon chopped into bacon bits. Add a dollop of Creme Fraiche into each bowl after serving - and you're good to go! Yum!

Harvest Time Roasted Tomato and Sweet Corn Soup

Roasting TomatoesAt lunch out yesterday at Mike's Cafe in Portola Valley, the special soup was roasted tomato and corn - and it was really lovely. While it's not exactly a soup day here today (temps heading into the 90's), it's the perfect time for both tomatoes and sweet corn so I decided to give this a whirl. It turns out magnificently - if I do say so myself! Total time to prepare - about an hour and 15 minutes.

Sunday's are Farmers Market day in Menlo Park so I headed out first thing to pick up the ingredients - basically 3 pounds of tomatoes (mostly San Marizano's but some yellow plum and others mixed in) and 3 ears of fresh sweet corn. I stopped by Trader Joe's to pickup a 28 oz can of plum tomatoes - we had everything else at home. The core recipe was inspired by one of the Barefoot Contessa's.

Read on for ingredients and directions!

Continue reading "Harvest Time Roasted Tomato and Sweet Corn Soup" »

Highly Recommended: Peperonata

Last weekend we picked up some fresh peppers at the local Farmers Market and made Elise's Peperonata recipe. Delicious and highly recommended!

Summertime Tri-Tip on the Weber BBQ

Charcoal grilled tritip roast

My son and family stopped by this afternoon following today's Sunset Celebration Weekend and we did just what we did last year - grilled a couple of tri-tips on our Weber charcoal BBQ. Turns out, we did just about the same thing last year! With the unusually wet and cool spring we've had in northern California this year, today was literally the first time we pulled the cover off the Weber to grill something!

I picked up two plain tri-tips earlier today from Bianchini's Market in Portola Valley. The first we seasoned with Tom Douglas' All Purpose Smoky Barbeque Rub - picked up this morning from Tom's booth at the Sunset event. The second we seasoned with rock salt - with a healthy dose of fresh ground Penzey's Special Extra Bold™ Black Peppercorns on both. We seasoned the tri-tips about 5 hours before we started grilling and put them back in the 'frig.

Like last year, I used Lazzari Mesquite Charcoal - which burns hotter than briquets, cooks to tri-tips faster and adds a very nice charcoal cooked flavor to the meat. Once lit in the chimney lighter, spread the coals all to one side of the Weber - that's going to be the direct heat side.

I seared the roasts over direct heat 5-7 mins per side (to a bit of nice char) and then cooked them on the indirect heat side for another 20-25 minutes until they reached an internal temperature of 130 degrees. Once they're at that temp, wrap them in foil and let them sit for at least 15 minutes to let the juices re-enter the meat. Then slice thinly across the grain and serve - preferably with an nice accompanying BBQ sauce. I had also picked up a jar of Tom Douglas' Ancho & Molasses Barbecue Sauce this morning at Sunset - and it was a perfect accompaniment to the tri-tip!

Charcoal grilled tritip roast sliced

We also grilled some veggies to accompany the roasts - including corn on the cob, onions, baby bok choy, zucchini and bell pepper. We cooked the veggies mostly over direct heat - taking care not to let them burn - while the tri-tips were cooking on the other side of the grill.

A great meal and first time BBQ of the season!

Spice It Up! with Pimientos de Padrón from Happy Quail Farms

If you're in the Bay Area and have a change to find these Pimientos de Padrón peppers from Happy Quail Farm in East Palo Alto, be sure to pick them up - they're a great addition to a steak or chicken BBQ.

We found them yesterday at the produce market at Market Hall on College Avenue in the Rockridge district of Oakland. Happy Quail Farms sells at a number of Farmers Markets in the Bay Area as well including the Ferry Plaza Market in San Francisco on Saturdays and Tuesdays and the Sunday morning Menlo Park Farmers Market.

Cooking these lil guys is also super easy: olive oil in a pan, stir until small white blisters appear, sprinkle with coarse salt and serve! Yum! (Beware that "typically one out of about a dozen is mild to scorching hot"!) Our batch yesterday was mild-mannered!

It's a Soup Day in Northern California!

We're having a struggle this Spring weather-wise - trying to shake off the winter storms and get into the usual - boring - late spring and summer weather in northern California. Today, a blustery set of heavy rain below in - with chilly winds, etc.

Anyway, it was a great day for soup - so we dusted off one of our favorite recipes from last year - Barley Soup With Mushrooms and Microgreens - made mostly with ingredients from our local Trader Joe's. It's a tasty and healthy soup that goes just right with days like today.

PS: For some reason, the right sidebar of Scott's Kitchen got disabled. We've identified and fixed the problem - everything seems to be back in working condition. If you notice any quirks, please let me know!

A Whole New Approach to Tri-Tip!

A few weeks ago, I noted Mark Bittman's alternative approach to cooking a great tri-tip steak. Tonight, we made Mark's recipe - with (naturally) our own tweaks. The result - steak and a modified Remesco sauce - was outstanding!

I followed Mark's recipe with respect to the tri-tip itself - cooking it 5 minutes over very high heat in a cast iron skillet - followed by putting the cast iron skillet into a very hot (450+ degrees) oven for (in our case) about 15 minutes (our oven peaks at 450 - not 500 degrees). The key is watching the tri-tip to reach 125 degrees internal temperature.

While grilling the tri-tip in the skillet, I also cooked the small plum tomatoes in the other half of the skillet. The tomatoes got nicely soft and a bit roasted. I took the tomatoes out of the skillet just before flipping the tri-tip as I was putting the tri-tip in the skillet into the high-heat oven.

The tomatoes went into another pan - along with some slivered almonds, some minced garlic, a healthy amount of olive oil and - a few minutes later - a few tablespoons of sherry wine vinegar. While the tri-tip finished cooking and resting for 5 minutes, the sauce simmered - developing an amazing flavor.

As usual, I sliced the tri-tip against the grain and smothered the slices on the serving plates with the sauce. Wow - what a great combination of flavors! With this technique, I avoided using a food processor and was able to use simpler ingredients (sliced almonds, minced garlic) to produce an amazing result! Thanks to Mark Bittman and his recipe for his suggestions on this Romesco sauce - the flavors are superb - and a great accompaniment to tri-tip!

Another Approach to Tri-Tip - with Romesco Sauce

Our 'Lazy-S' Easy Oven-Roasted Tri-Tip recipe is among the most viewed recipes here in Scott's Kitchen. Tri-tip makes a great meal (and wonderful leftovers for use over salad, on sandwiches, etc.) Depending on the time of year, you can easily oven-roast them or, when it's BBQ season, cook them on the Weber. Either way, they turn out great!

Here's a different approach to tri-tip (with a romesco sauce addition) by Mark Bittman who writes The Minimalist column for the New York Times. Bittman's technique involves pan searing the tri-tip (along with the ingredients for the romesco sauce) in a cast-iron skillet followed by finishing the tri-tip in a 500 degree oven. Here's his column about tri-tips, his recipe, and a 5-minute video showing him preparing it.

Bittman says that it can be hard to find tri-tips in New York - a problem we certainly don't have out here in California - where the tri-tip is a very popular cut of beef!

New Year's Eve Pasta - 2009 Edition

My wife made a wonderful pasta dish for tonight's New Year's Eve supper. She made it up as she went along - something she likes to do and is very good at! I tried to capture the process in real-time!

Here's the gist:

  • Bring 6 qts water to a boil over high heat, add 2 Tbsp salt, add 1 lb fettucine. Cook al dente and drain pasta.
  • While waiting for the pasta water to boil, heat 3 Tbsp olive oil in a large saute pan over medium heat.
  • Add 3 diced shallots and 1/4 tsp red pepper flakes and saute quickly.
  • Add 8-10 oz sliced cremini mushrooms, season with salt and pepper. Saute the mushrooms until softened, about 5 min.
  • Add 1/2 cup low-sodium chicken broth, 5 cut-up pieces of cooked bacon, 1/2 lb thin, sliced asparagus and 6 Roma sliced tomatoes (peeled or peel after cooking a bit).
  • Cook stirring gently for 2 minutes. Stir in 3/4 cup heavy cream (or 1/2 cup cream and 1/4 cup red wine). Immediately reduce heat and cook until thickened.

That's it - a very tasty pasta dish for New Year's Eve. Serve with a special red wine (we served ours with a wonderful Copain Anderson Valley Pinot Noir that was a Christmas gift from good friends)

Happy New Year! Best wishes for a wonderful 2010!

A Dry-Brined and High-Heat Upside Down Turkey

12_25.pngMerry Christmas!

Today, for our Christmas dinner 2009, we'll be cooking a 14-lb Diestel turkey that we've dry-brined this week using this recipe from an article in the Los Angeles Times. Dry brining requires thinking ahead - like three days ahead when the turkey needs to be salted and tucked away in the back of the refrigerator.

We'll be cooking the bird today using our high-heat upside down roast turkey recipe, a family favorite that produces wonderful results.

Friends are bringing a couple of side dishes to have along with the stuffing we'll be making. Yum! - getting hungry already!

Update: Just a quick note to report that the Christmas turkey turned out to be excellent - moist white meat, great flavor! Our little experiment in dry-brining the holiday bird was a big success! Thanks to Russ Parsons for his article and recipe!

Some Tips on Pinot Noir for Thanksgiving Dinner

redwineglass.pngLast week, the Wall St. Journal's Tastings column by Dorothy Gaiter and John Brecher features a list of pinot noirs they recommend for Thanksgiving dinner.

While they personally say they prefer a great aged Cabernet Sauvignon with their turkey, many folks prefer the lighter Pinot Noir. They note that "Pinot Noir, at its best, has elegant, sometimes earthy tastes that would pair well with Thanksgiving dinner without adding yet another big, challenging taste to the table."

What's on their list? (Click here for the complete article):

We're also partial to the Navarro Pinot Noir Méthode à l'Ancienne from the Anderson Valley in Mendocino county. Navarro is one of our favorite wineries and their Pinot is a delight! Enjoy!

Are you doing the cooking the turkey this Thanksgiving and looking for a great recipe? Be sure to checkout our all-time most popular recipe: Scott's High Heat Upside-Down Roast Turkey Recipe!

Looking for something other than turkey? Here's another all-time favorite: Scott's 'Lazy-S' Easy Oven-Roasted Tri-Tips!

Scott's Perfect Charcoal BBQ Thick Cut Pork Chops

We love our Weber - an early model of the Performa. A while back we had this fancy indirect heating gas grill - but it just didn't provide much flavor for BBQing so we gave it away and bought the Weber over 10 years ago. It's been our regular fire ever since - IMHO nothing beats a hot charcoal fire for the best flavor.

porkchops.jpgOn one of our morning walks last week, Chris Gulker started talking about his new Weber Performa BBQ and how he had cooked a pair of very tasty thick cut pork chops on it last weekend. Naturally, my ears perked up - pork chops are an old favorite but mostly pan fried with some sauerkraut, not BBQed.

Taking Chris' excellent results to heart, we tried our own version on the Weber tonight. The result was superb - just great - and simple. I was cooking two thick cut chops - about 1.7 lbs of meat that we had picked up at a local butcher yesterday (priced at $5.99-$6.29 a pound in our neighborhood).

Continue reading "Scott's Perfect Charcoal BBQ Thick Cut Pork Chops" »

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